http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Improving lower limb weight distribution asymmetry during the squat using Nintendo WII balance boards and real-time feedback http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21384 Wed 21 Dec 2016 09:48:49 AEST ]]> Feasibility of ballistic strengthening exercises in neurologic rehabilitation http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21368 Wed 21 Dec 2016 08:17:44 AEST ]]> The effects of enhanced plantar sensory feedback and foot orthoses on midfoot kinematics and lower leg neuromuscular activation http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21428 Thu 22 Dec 2016 12:24:44 AEST ]]> Low-cost evaluation and real-time feedback of static and dynamic weight bearing asymmetry in patients undergoing in-patient physiotherapy rehabilitation for neurological conditions http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21418 Thu 22 Dec 2016 10:25:47 AEST ]]> A pilot investigation using global positioning systems into the outdoor activity of people with severe traumatic brain injury http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21416 Thu 22 Dec 2016 10:11:53 AEST ]]> Cardiovascular fitness is unrelated to mobility limitations in ambulant people with traumatic brain injury http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21414 .05) between mobility, activity levels, and cardiovascular fitness in the TBI cohort. Participants with TBI had significantly reduced capacity for mobility (P < .001) and performed less physical activity (P = .002) than matched HCs; however, there was no significant difference in cardiovascular fitness (P = .094) between groups. CONCLUSIONS:: Despite reduced physical activity and a wide range in capacity to mobilize, no relationship was identified between mobility and cardiovascular fitness following TBI. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.]]> Thu 22 Dec 2016 09:43:44 AEST ]]> Design and validation of a portable, inexpensive and multi-beam timing light system using the Nintendo Wii hand controllers http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21407 8%). Conclusions: A NWHC timing light system is inexpensive, portable and valid for assessing running velocity. Errors in the 5. m standing start trials may have been due to erroneous event detection by either the commercial or NWHC-based timing light systems. © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia.]]> Thu 22 Dec 2016 08:54:45 AEST ]]> Reliability and validity of the Microsoft Kinect for evaluating static foot posture http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21473 Thu 05 Jan 2017 09:54:51 AEST ]]> Concurrent validity of the Microsoft Kinect for assessment of spatiotemporal gait variables http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21434 0.90). Foot swing velocity possessed excellent relative (r=0.93) but only modest overall (rc=0.54) agreement. Step time (r=0.82 and rc=0.23) and stride time (r=0.69 and rc=0.14) possessed excellent and modest relative agreement respectively but poor overall agreement. Landmark location linearity was excellent (R2=0.991). This widely available, low-cost and portable system could provide clinicians with significant advantages for assessing some spatiotemporal gait parameters. However, caution must be taken when choosing outcome variables as some commonly reported variables cannot be accurately measured. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.]]> Mon 09 Jan 2017 12:04:02 AEST ]]> Instrumenting gait assessment using the Kinect in people living with stroke: Reliability and association with balance tests http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21417 0.75) and not strongly correlated (Spearman's ρ < 0.80) with each other (i.e. non-redundant). Results: Kinect-derived variables were found to be highly reliable (all ICCs > 0.80), but many were redundant. The final regression model using Kinect-derived variables consisted of the asymmetry scores, mean gait velocity, affected limb foot swing velocity and the difference between peak and mean gait velocity. In comparison with the clinically-derived regression model, the Kinect-derived model accounted for >15% more variance on the MLWS, ST and FR tests and scored similarly on all other measures. Conclusions: In conclusion, instrumenting gait using the Kinect is reliable and provides insight into the dynamic balance capacity of people living with stroke. This system provides a minimally intrusive method of examining potentially important gait characteristics in people living with stroke. © 2015 Clark et al.; licensee BioMed Central.]]> Mon 09 Jan 2017 10:58:53 AEST ]]> Quantifying individual components of the timed up and go using the kinect in people living with stroke http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21392 Mon 09 Jan 2017 10:58:48 AEST ]]> Acute effects of a shoe with enhanced plantar sensory feedback on midfoot kinematics whilst walking http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21503 Fri 06 Jan 2017 10:52:46 AEST ]]> Reliability of an inexpensive and portable dynamic weight bearing asymmetry assessment system incorporating dual Nintendo Wii Balance Boards http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:21493 Fri 06 Jan 2017 09:29:40 AEST ]]>