http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 A conceptual model of preferential flow systems in forested hillslopes: Evidence of self-organization http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15862 Mon 25 Nov 2019 15:22:42 AEST ]]> Seasonal hydrologic response at various spatial scales in a small forested catchment, Hitachi Ohta, Japan http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:14870 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:50:11 AEST ]]> Flow and solute transport through the soil matrix and macropores of a hillslope segment http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:16116 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:49:27 AEST ]]> Spatially distributed morphological characteristics of macropores in forest soils of Hitachi Ohta Experimental Watershed, Japan http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:14851 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:49:23 AEST ]]> Contribution of intercepted subsurface flow to road runoff and sediment transport in a logging-disturbed tropical catchment http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:14829 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:48:47 AEST ]]> Persistence of road runoff generation in a logged catchment in Peninsular Malaysia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:14830 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:48:33 AEST ]]> Morphological characteristics of macropores and the distribution of preferential flow pathways in a forested slope segment http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:16459 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:48:31 AEST ]]> Subsurface runoff characteristics from a forest hillslope soil profile including macropores, Hitachi Ohta, Japan http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15805 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:48:21 AEST ]]> Stormflow generation involving pipe flow in a zero-order basin of Peninsular Malaysia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15804 20 mm in relatively wet antecedent moisture conditions. Runoff derived from direct precipitation falling onto saturated areas accounted for <0.2% of total ZOB flow volume during the study period, indicating the predominance of subsurface pathways in ZOB flow. ZOB flow (high EC and low Si) was distinct from perennial baseflow via bedrock seepage (low EC and high Si) 5 m downstream of the ZOB outlet. Pipe flow responded quickly to ZOB flow rate and was characterized by a threshold flow capacity unique to each pipe. Piezometric data and pipe flow records demonstrated that pipes located deeper in the soil initiated first, followed by those at shallower depths; initiation of pipe flow corresponded to shallow groundwater rise above the saprolite-soil interface. Chemical signatures of pipe flow were similar to each other and to the ZOB flow, suggesting that the sources were well-mixed soil-derived shallow groundwater. Based upon the volume of pipe flow during storms, the combined contribution of the pipes monitored accounted for 48% of total ZOB flow during the study period. Our results suggest that shallow groundwater, possibly facilitated by preferential flow accreted above the saprolite-soil interface, provides dominant stormflow, and that soil pipes play an important role in the rapid delivery of solute-rich water to the stream system. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.]]> Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:48:07 AEST ]]> Impacts of logging disturbance on hillslope saturated hydraulic conductivity in a tropical forest in Peninsular Malaysia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:16106 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:47:56 AEST ]]> Sediment and wood accumulations in humid tropical headwater streams: Effects of logging and riparian buffers http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:16072 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:46:57 AEST ]]> Ecological roles of roadside fern (Dicranopteris curranii) on logging road recovery in Peninsular Malaysia: Preliminary results http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:16073 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:46:55 AEST ]]> Stormflow generation in steep forested headwaters: A linked hydrogeomorphic paradigm http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15859 Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:46:02 AEST ]]> Sediment pathways in a tropical forest: Effects of logging roads and skid trails http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15863 20% gradient) had slightly higher erosion rates (320 ± 24 t ha-+ year-+ than trails with gentler gradients (245-264 t ha-+ year-+). Some 60% of the soil loss on logging roads comes from erosion of the running surface. Disturbed cut and fill material along the road supplied the remaining 40% of the soil loss from roads. Roads and skid trails had no designed drainage systems; runoff discharged onto the hillslope at 25 major discharge nodes from the logging road (690 m total length) and at 34 nodes from skid trails (2300 m). Sediment pathways were either fully or moderately connected to headwater channels at 64% of the logging road nodes, but at only 26% of the nodes emanating from skid trails. A detailed sediment budget revealed that 78% of the soil loss from the road system (including log landings) was delivered to the stream in the first 16 months after logging began. Most (90%) of the deposition from skid trails occurred below just three discharge nodes. Runoff from and onto skid trails often exacerbated the sediment connectivity to channels. Clearly, sediment discharge from logging roads was more highly connected to the stream than discharge from skid trails. Once in the channel, much of this sediment was temporarily stored in the floodplain and behind woody debris. © 2004 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.]]> Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:45:51 AEST ]]> A zero-order basin - its contribution to catchment hydrology and internal hydrological processes http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:15868 5 mm d-1, all three basins generated runoff of the same order per unit area (level 2: linear contribution). Piezometers installed above the soil-bedrock interface (0.5 to 1.2 m depth) along the longitudinal axis of ZB responded only in the lower locations when runoff from ZB << discharge from FB. Conversely, the major runoff contribution from ZB to the discharge from FB generally coincided with a large piezometric rise near the head hollow. Soil temperatures in the head hollow fluctuated even during some rainstorms, indicating that such a large piezometric rise was caused by a convergent subsurface flow from the further upslope. Thus, shallow groundwater, which developed above the trough of ZB, would not always extend from the base to the upslope but may appear simultaneously in the head hollow. This additional contribution due to upslope topography may create additional variability and non-linearity in runoff response from ZB relative to planar hillslopes. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. This study aims to evaluate the relative contribution of a zero-order basin to runoff generation in a headwater catchment as well as to elucidate internal factors affecting hydrological response. Runoff, piezometric heads, and soil temperatures were measured for a 0.25 ha zero-order basin (ZB) together with discharges from an adjacent 0.84 ha 1st-order basin (FA) and a larger 2.48 ha 1st-order basin (FB) which includes both ZB and FA. Data collected over a year showed ZB contributed to runoff generation in FB at three different levels. While continuous runoff was recorded from both FB and FA, no substantial runoff was measured for ZB during dry conditions when discharge from FB<0.5 mm d-1 (level 0: no contribution). For wetter conditions above this threshold, the ZB augmented stormflow and the discharge ratios of ZB to FB (on a unit area basis) increased rapidly from zero up to unity with increasing wetness (level 1: non-linear contribution). During the wettest periods when discharge from FB>5 mm d-1, all three basins generated runoff of the same order per unit area (level 2: linear contribution). Piezometers installed above the soil-bedrock interface (0.5 to 1.2 m depth) along the longitudinal axis of ZB responded only in the lower locations when runoff from ZB≪discharge from FB. Conversely, the major runoff contribution from ZB to the discharge from FB generally coincided with a large piezometric rise near the head hollow. Soil temperatures in the head hollow fluctuated even during some rainstorms, indicating that such a large piezometric rise was caused by a convergent subsurface flow from the further upslope. Thus, shallow groundwater, which developed above the trough of ZB, would not always extend from the base to the upslope but may appear simultaneously in the head hollow. This additional contribution due to upslope topography may create additional variability and non-linearity in runoff response from ZB relative to planar hillslopes.]]> Fri 14 Jun 2019 13:45:37 AEST ]]>