http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Whole-genome sequencing to investigate a non-clonal melioidosis cluster on a remote Australian island http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:22666 Wed 14 Mar 2018 09:56:39 AEST ]]> Pathogen to commensal: longitudinal within-host population dynamics, evolution, and adaptation during a chronic >16-year Burkholderia pseudomallei infection http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:28336 16-year period, and also sampled the patients home environment, recovering six closely related B. pseudomallei isolates from water. Using comparative genomics, we identified 126 SNPs in the core genome of the 124 isolates or 162 SNPs/indels when the accessory genome was included. The core SNPs were used to construct a phylogenetic tree, which demonstrated a close relationship between environmental and clinical isolates and detailed within-host evolutionary patterns. The phylogeny had little homoplasy, consistent with a single clonal population. Repeated sampling revealed evidence of genetic diversification, but frequent extinctions left only one successful lineage through the first four years and two lineages after that, resulting in a highly linear topology. Although these extinctions and persistence could be explained by genetic drift, we observe phenotypic changes consistent with in situ adaptation. Using a mouse model, P314 isolates caused greatly reduced morbidity and mortality compared to the environmental isolates. Additionally, potentially adaptive phenotypes changed with time and included differences in the O-antigen, capsular polysaccharide, motility, and colony morphology. The >13-year co-existence of two long-lived lineages presents interesting hypotheses that can be tested in future studies to provide additional insights into selective pressures, niche differentiation, and microbial adaptation. This unusual melioidosis case presents a rare example of the evolutionary progression to commensalism by a highly virulent pathogen within a single human host.]]> Tue 25 Jun 2019 11:23:44 AEST ]]> Phylogeographic, genomic, and meropenem susceptibility analysis of Burkholderia ubonensis http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:23681 Tue 24 Oct 2017 11:37:52 AEST ]]> Comparative Genomics of Burkholderia singularis sp. nov., a Low G+C Content, Free-Living Bacterium That Defies Taxonomic Dissection of the Genus Burkholderia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:23660 Tue 24 Oct 2017 09:10:53 AEST ]]> Tracing the environmental footprint of the Burkholderia pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide genotypes in the tropical “Top End” of the Northern Territory, Australia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:29264 Tue 06 Aug 2019 10:27:43 AEST ]]> Suspected cases of intracontinental Burkholderia pseudomallei sequence type homoplasy resolved using whole-genome sequencing http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:24591 Thu 13 Sep 2018 08:51:24 AEST ]]> Autochthonous Melioidosis in Humans, Madagascar, 2012 and 2013 http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:22749 Mon 31 Jul 2017 16:15:07 AEST ]]> Tracing the environmental footprint of the Burkholderia pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide genotypes in the tropical “Top End” of the Northern Territory, Australia http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:29044 Fri 28 Jun 2019 13:28:57 AEST ]]> Burkholderia pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide genotype does not correlate with severity or outcome in melioidosis: host risk factors remain the critical determinant http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:28294 Fri 12 Apr 2019 13:12:49 AEST ]]> Burkholderia pseudomallei distribution in Australasia is linked to paleogeographic and anthropogenic history http://research.usc.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/usc:27630 Fri 09 Nov 2018 10:03:31 AEST ]]>